Image of a birth control implant
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Implant

An implant is a birth control method with very low failure rate. It's a tiny rod containing a hormone, which is injected just under the skin on your arm.

It can stay in place for three to five years. The implant gives off a steady supply of the hormone progestin, which prevents you from getting pregnant by thickening the cervical mucus and inhibition ovulation.

The implant can reduce cramps and make you bleed less. Your periods can become more irregular though.

It doesn’t protect against STDs, and side-effects include headaches, acne, and ovarian cysts. Spotting is quite common. In rare cases, the implant can also grow into your muscle or move, making it more difficult to remove it.

Implants are great for women after giving birth, smokers over the ages of 35, and women with high blood pressure.

 

Comments
Hi Frank, Some of the side effects include the following nausea, stomach cramping/bloating/pain, dizziness, headache, mood changes, breast tenderness or pain, weight gain, back pain, menstrual cramps, changes in menstrual periods, vaginal itching, and vaginal irritation or discharge. No all the side effects will occur at the same time. Talk to your health provider about other serious side effects that may require medical attention.
Hey Vicky, usually the IUD is removed when it reaches its expiration date. This is between 3 and 10 years and upto 12 years for Copper IUDs. Did your doctor tell you when the IUD will expire? It maybe important for you to visit a medical centre for advice from a health worker and the removal. Check out the following article;- https://lovematters.co.ke/birth-control/types-of-birth-control/iud

Hi Ivy, the most common side effect of the Implant is irregular bleeding (or spotting), especially in the first 6-12 months. Sometimes the implant causes long-term spotting, or periods get longer and heavier. But for most people, the implant makes their periods way lighter. Most people with the implant stop getting their periods at all after a year. It’s also totally safe to not get a period. 

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